Publishers of books that change lives

Raising 21st Century Boys

First published in 1995, Raising Boys was an instant bestseller and to date has sold over a million copies worldwide. Few books have stayed in the hearts and minds of parents everywhere as much as Raising Boys. Now in an increasingly complicated and nuanced world, raising boys to become emotionally strong, kind and resilient men is even more important and relevant. In response to calls from parents around the world Steve Biddulph has completely updated and revised his seminal work to include all the latest international information and advice for parents on all the key issues of today such as :

  • Gender
  • Brain and hormonal development including latest
    findings on testostetrone
  • Transgender/gay/sexuality development
  • Boys and crying
  • Boys and ‘bad’ behaviour
  • Reading and communication
  • Countering the effects of porn

Steve says:

‘Right now, the world badly needs good men. Your boy can be one of those who grow up so much better, and help to heal the world. Thank you for joining the boy revolution. As the 21st century rolls on, it’s badly needed. Enjoy your boy, love him well, and set him free to fly in his own special way.’

Women Like Us


From the stage to the page…

Stand up comedians Mandy Nolan and Ellen Briggs have spent the last 3 years touring the country with their smash hit comedy show Women Like Us performing over 80 shows to just over 20 000 people!  Their formula of performing two hours of stand up (an hour a piece) has proven a huge hit, with audiences in droves declaring this one of the funniest stand up shows they’ve seen. It’s true. The girls are master story tellers able to deliver belly-laugh’s every 30 seconds. And now the girls take it from the stage to the page with the release of their co-authored book Women Like Us.

Women Like Us though based on their bestselling show, delves deeper into the minutiae that makes up the drama of life…and turns society’s expectations of what women should be upside down. Women Like Us is for anybody who is tired of being told what they must look like, act like or even talk like!

Essentially this is for all women!!

For More Info and blogs from Women Like Us – go to

For More Info on Mandy and Ellen’s Dates and appearances go to

Cold Vein and MamaMia Podcast

As a regular listenter to some of the podcasts from the MamaMia network I was beyond all states of excitement when I accompanied our author Anne Tonner, the winner of the 2017 Finch Memoir Prize for her book Cold Vein, to the offices of MamaMia in Surry Hills, to record a podcast episode of No Filter with none other than Mia Freedman herself.
I wasn’t sure what to expect as we entered the rather ordinary looking building and took the lift to the third floor but was hugely surprised to discover, upon exiting the lift, a huge (like I mean HUGE) light-filled room filled with desks and computers and people. There was also plants and astro turf and the steady, slightly manic energy of a lot of very busy people.
The podcast recording studio itself is quite small, completely blacked out on the inside and the walls covered in soundproof padding. (I am sure there is a technical name but I have no idea what it is, basically it looked like grey foam eggshell cartons.) I shoved myself in the corner, trying to be as unobtrusive as possible while Anne sat at the desk, looking a bit like she was about to endure a rather unpleasant counselling session…I did feel for her as doing interviews can be quite taxing and frightening but I knew she has prepared. Then Mia swept in and I was surprised to see that she was about as big as me (i.e. short and small) and was not wearing typical office-like clothes but a tee shirt and cargo combat pants. However, she did have on a very impressive pair of silver sneakers which I immediately wanted. A lot.
She very quickly made Anne feel comfortable, asked her if there was anything she didn’t want to talk about and then launched into the interview. For a full hour, without any notes or even referring to the book itself, Mia was able to vividly recall exact wording and phrasing of parts of Anne’s story, and asked some very insightful and interning questions. I was actually rather impressed with her skill (not to mention her sneakers) and thought that Anne answered all her questions beautifully and thoughtfully. It really was a terrific experience and I am sure it will make a great interview. I hope you can find some time to listen to it when it comes out on the No Filter podcast today.
Follow the links below

Danielle Ross Walls

Danielle Ross Walls is mum to two energetic boys, aged 8 and 5 years. In 2015, she created and directed the first Careers Expo for working mothers in Melbourne. Danielle’s publishing history includes freelance writing for MamaMag, Kids and Places Australia, Tasmanian Living and Nurture Parenting Magazine. Her writing is largely travel-focused, with an aim to get people, especially children, engaged in nature, history and conservation.

Louise Correcha

Louise Correcha is mum to a 4-year-old daughter. She is the co-founder and Director of adult language support services company, Red English (, for which she co-wrote an online Spanish course. Louise also writes for and consults on written communication strategies for a range of technical, corporate and not-for-profit clients. She is also a copywriter for Melbourne design agency Blick Creative.

Working Mums

Working Mums: Stories by real women on how they manage children, work and life.

Compiled by two Australian mums to help support other parents, Working Mums: Stories by real women on how they manage children, work and life is a collection of empowering stories from Australian mothers. The book’s primary aim is to help working mums feel less alone in their challenges to juggle work, children and daily life. Readers might also be inspired to try new careers.

Contributors to Working Mums include:

  • Missy Higgins, singer and songwriter

  • George McEncroe, founder of Australia’s first all-female rideshare  Shebah, radio host and comedian

  • Annie Nolan, social commentator, author of the popular ‘Uncanny Annie’ blog, and wife of AFL Western Bulldogs premiership player Liam Picken

  • Alisa Camplin, Winter Olympic champion

  • Simone McLaughlin, founder of Jobs Shared

  • Ella Haddad, Labor Candidate in Hobart

  • Kristy Vallely, founder of the immensely popular ‘The Imperfect Mum’ online community

  • Chloe Chant, early childhood educator whose letter to a senator went viral

  • Carly and Alee, QLD same-sex IVF couple


    For more information and blogs from this book please visit

Anyone for a cup of tea? Or not?

My younger son started uni last year and we have been talking about dating and yes, ok, about sex, which lead to a discussion on recognising a Yes or a No. The signs of sexual consent. Yes, tricky!

He told me that the student body had posted The Cup of Tea PSA, a clever Thames Valley Police 3 minute video featuring stick figures, to ensure the first years understood the concept of sexual consent on campus.

In The Cup of Tea PSA, rules of consent are explained using that most fantastic of English traditions, tea drinking. Almost universally you will be asked the question in every home in Britain, ‘Would you like a cup of tea?’

Tea as a euphemism, well, well!

The video begins with the very up front and straight down the line, ‘Oh my God, I would love a cup of tea!’ response, no grey lines here. But then it moves into illustrating where consent lines can get blurry. These responses range from the fairly simple: to understanding that your guest did want tea, but changed his or her mind once you put the kettle on, to the less clear: your guest isn’t really sure how to feel about tea right now.

If you say, ‘Hey, would you like a cup of tea?’ and your guest answers, ‘Uh, you know, I’m not really sure,’ then you can make them a cup of tea, but be aware that they might not drink it.

And if they don’t drink it, then — and this is the important bit — don’t make them drink it. Just because you made it doesn’t mean they have to drink it. And if they say, ‘No, thank you’, then don’t make them tea. At all.

The video goes on to explain what to do if someone loses consciousness while you are asking them if they want tea, even if they said yes prior to passing out, ‘you should just put the tea down, make sure the unconscious person is safe and, this is the important part again, don’t make them drink the tea.’

That’s a lot of talk of tea and I get it, I do. My son said that yes it was an important message but he doesn’t have to remember the making a cup of tea analogy to recognise the signs of sexual consent from potential partners and he certainly would never give tea to anyone unconscious!

In Love, Sex and No Regrets for Today’s Teens, author Elizabeth Clarke writes about how important it is being able to practise saying, ‘I’m not comfortable with that, I don’t know you that well, I want to know you better’ or simply ‘No’.

Elizabeth stresses that a healthy sexuality for teens comes down to being old enough and mature enough to know how to say ‘No’ when you need to and to recognise when your partner is saying ‘No’. That means if you aren’t getting a response from your partner, if there’s shrugging or suggestions of ‘I don’t know’ then that is a ‘No’.  An unenthusiastic anything is a ‘No’.

‘Yes, just do it’, or ‘I may as well get it over with’, are responses that really shouldn’t be heard but seem to be accepted in our sexualised society where boundaries do get blurry and issues of self-worth aren’t discussed. Elizabeth tells us what these ‘No’ signs are from other people in a straightforward, honest way.

The Brits do love their tea and the PSA does get the message across, albeit very simplistically.  However, it does ultimately demonstrate the importance of  ‘No means No, which is a message our teenagers need to know the signs of, with or without a cup of tea as their guide.

Sarah Blundell

Mick Miller

Mick Miller has coached athletes for the last six Olympics, is a cancer survivor, performance coach, motivational speaker and adventurer. He uses his experiences from his professional life and personal challenges to deliver presentations and coaching sessions to inspire and motivate people to achieve their goals. Proceeds from the sale of this book will be donated to The Tomorrow Trust, a charity set up by Mick to help support cancer patients and their families post treatment.

Getting a Lift Mick’s Way – Ep1

Mick Miller has a chat with some important people in his life in his faithful ’68 VW Beetle. Mick survived cancer and packed up the Rocket and headed out around Australia. He speaks with some of the people who helped make that possible for him and the resulting book Travelling Australia Mick’s Way.

Finch Memoir Prize announced!!

Finch Publishing is pleased to announce that the winner for the 2018 Finch Memoir Prize is Vicki Laveau-Harvie with Okotoks Erratic.
The three judges, Candida Baker, Caroline Baum and Mark O’Flynn, were in complete agreement about this dark humoured story of an out of control family beset with decay and bitterness.
Caroline Baum said, ‘Okotoks Erratic grabbed me by the throat and never let go …  Its sharp vinegary tone added  a thrilling and bracing  note to  this portrayal  of an extreme  dysfunctional family. The writing has a visceral quality as well as a terrific sense of timing, irony and place … I loved it.’
Candida Baker described the manuscript as reminding her of ‘a young Margaret Attwood or Alice Munro’.
Mark O’Flynn said the writing was ‘clear and concise, and wonderfully written’.
The winner, Vicki Laveau-Harvie, says: I am so very pleased to be the winner of the 2018 FinchMemoir Prize. Writing memoir represents freedom and possibility for anyone who chooses to do it. To share what I’ve written as a result of this prize will be an enduring joy for me.’
The judges also wished to award a Highly Commended to Fay Keegan and her manuscript
All Stations to Waterfall.
The winning manuscript will be published in June 2018.